How do we Talk to Children about the Terrorist Attacks?

It is a frightening and unpredictable world not only for us as adults but also for children. Children worry about all sorts of things from having to read out loud in class, friendships all the way to the dangers of the world; children are generally worried little folk! So what can we do as parents? Do we talk about the terrorist attacks? We discussed in our Helping children through bereavement blog post about talking openly with children and this is very much the advice resonated from some of the leading psychiatrists and psychologist, encouraging parents, to talk to their children about the recent events. In an article in the BBC news online, consultant Clinical Psychologist Emma Citron, who specialises in children and trauma, says families should not shy away from talking about such events. “Give children basic facts, tell them what it is they want to know, ask them what they would. Support them and comfort them and be there for them, hug them, just respond to how they’re responding emotionally. Take the lead from them – we need to know what it is they want answers to.” Here are some of our key thoughts but all children are unique so always keep in mind your child’s age, temperament and maturity: Be open and honest and make sure your responses are age appropriate. Try not to bombard children with too much information, try and keep it simple, less is more. Make your child feel safe; most children want to know that they are safe so this is key. Try not to dismiss their worries by saying “you don’t need to worry”,...

Allowing Your Child to Grow Up

They grow up so fast! Every parent knows the heartache of realising their baby is no longer their baby. Allowing your child to grow up, from first words and baby-steps to first sleepovers and driving lessons with loving support and sensible guidance will naturally help them become well rounded and happy individuals. Starting as young as possible with positive reinforcement, consistency and encouragement will give your child the very best start towards a path of self-awareness, confidence and success. As difficult as it may be, your child will need to learn some lessons on their own. While you may want to step in and take over or make decisions for your child, often children will learn from their own mistakes or wrong decisions without a parent intervening. Try not to be over protective by rushing to resolve the problem or situation your child has reached, but rather discuss the outcome of his behaviour and explain what would be a better solution in future. Helping your child to think about their actions and encouraging them to come to their own conclusions will help prepare them for making the right choices as they continue into adulthood. If you’re a parent who would like to learn more about how you can help your children towards success in any area of their life, contact Niche Etiquette Children. There are a range of services available from one-to-one coaching sessions to group etiquette classes that can benefit children ages 7-13 years or the whole family. Don’t wait, start your children off to the best start today!...